Raspberry Pi Pure Data experience?

  • Since I've invested in a monome and learnt max msp i keep making a conscious effort to have a more and more DIY approach to the point now that rather than relying on the corporate creation of the mac book pro to start trying to understand the mother board of a computer from as basic as i can, on words. I was going to invest in a Raspberry Pi and try and run Pure Data? I use max msp on a mac book pro 13" atm and have ALOT of samples saved that I then store in buffers and perform obviously with many many groove objects......I wanted to know if people had an understanding/experience of where the performance limitations are if I where to use pure data on a raspberry pie with a monome 256. Would it struggle early on to hold a significant amount of audio information ? And what happens about CPUage and so on ?

    Thanks for reading once again

    Joel

  • Check out this small page on Pure Data's site:
    http://puredata.info/docs/raspberry-pi

    From a quick scan, looks like you're going to have to perform some investigation and testing with a Raspberry and your specific software use case.

    You'll definitely want to:
    Run the Raspberry Pi headless
    Use an external USB audio interface

    The link pointing to http://wiki.linuxaudio.org/wiki/raspberrypi has lots of good stuff!

  • The raspberry pi. Very interesting device. To me, it still is it's early stages. At my university we started a few Robotics projects using them and they've been very helpful, but at the same time have some limitations, but most shouldn't concern you.

    As for performance lag, I haven't experimented with PD on the RPi yet, but I would guess that anything substantial for the monome256 like mlr might produce some lag. If it seems to lag too much try running PD in the command line it's very helpful for situations like this, as it will reduce CPU drastically, but that means no GUI, so everything has to have triggers / be controlled via monome.

    Also, not sure how best to store large amounts of samples for recall. The SD card that holds the OS can either be filled with zeros, so that only the OS and software stay on it, or left with empty space like a hard drive (Good option 32/64GB SD Cards). But don't know how fast those read. USB thumb drive / external drive would be the other option.

  • unfortunately i had little/no time to play with my rpi + pd lately but as @murray said:
    "You'll definitely want to:
    Run the Raspberry Pi headless
    Use an external USB audio interface"
    + i think you'll need a powered usb hub to run a 256 (maybe it's possible to power the pi via the hub also, but i think a normal power supply is recommended for rpi audio purposes)

    "I use max msp on a mac book pro 13" atm and have ALOT of samples saved that I then store in buffers and perform obviously with many many groove objects"
    ...not sure but maybe the rpi's ram could be a bottleneck....

    ...if you do not know already, this might also be interesting for you...
    https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~eberdahl/satellite/

  • great! so its not impossible then :) thank you very much for your information, ill probably be reporting back soon...

  • Not impossible at all.

    Here's a disc image which might be helpful:
    http://pd-la.info/pdpi/

    And some videos (not pi specific) to get you started learning:
    http://pd-la.info/pd-media/miller-puckette-mus171-videos/